Texans for Reproductive Rights


Texan pro-choice blog. Information on Texas news, events, and politics. Anything that we feel falls under the heading of "reproductive rights" (including abortion facts, sex education, and sexual health information)

Recent Tweets @TXRepRights

emilys-list:

WUT

ppaction:

BREAKING: Our new poll with EMILY’s List and American Women shows that issues of women’s health, rights, and economic security are the key to turning out voters — and electing candidates who will protect, not attack, our rights.

This is how we win in 2014. We’ve got 8 weeks left to make sure voters know exactly what’s on the line for women and families: share this to spread the word!

(via emilys-list)

whiskeydaisy:

While we’re talking about awesome women in the Texas legislature (Wendy Davis, Leticia Van de Putte, Mary Gonzalez, Alma Allen, and everyone else who extended the debate in the House and supported Davis during the Senate filibuster), let me introduce you to Texas State Representative Senfronia Thompson, who represents the north Houston area.
Rep. Thompson, at the time a public school teacher, was elected to the Texas house in 1972 and is currently serving her 20th term in office. I don’t usually copy/paste Wikipedia, but this is as concise as a description of her career can be:

Thompson has chaired both the Texas Legislative Black Caucus and the Women’s Health Caucus. She is also a member of the Democratic National Committee, a state director of Women in Government, and a member of the Energy Council. She serves on the House Committees on Judiciary and Civil Jurisprudence, State Sovereignty, Licensing and Administrative Procedures, and chairs the Local and Consent Calendar procedural committee. For 12 years, she chaired the House Judicial Affairs Committees. In 1987, she chaired the first standing committee in the Legislature to have a female majority.
Thompson has authored and passed more than 200 Texas laws, including Texas´ first alimony law, the James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Act, laws prohibiting racial profiling, the state minimum wage, the Durable Power of Attorney Act, the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act, the Sexual Assault Program Fund, the Model School Records Flagging Act, the Uniform Child Custody & Jurisdiction Enforcement Act, contraceptive parity, and scores of other reforms benefiting women, children and the elderly. Thompson pushed through major reforms in child support enforcement, simplified probate proceedings, and complete overhauls of statutes dealing with statutory county courts and municipal courts. In 2005, she passed legislation requiring free testing for the human papilloma virus (HPV), an early indicator of cervical cancer, for women who have health insurance.

This is the woman who, while speaking in the House against the parallel bill to SB50, hung a wire coat hanger on the podium. Rep. Thompson is 74. She remembers the days before Roe v. Wade. She knows what the world looks like to women who do not have accessible, safe medical care. 
We often focus our accolades on people who serve at the national level. Yesterday was a good reminder that battles are fought on the ground, and it’s our state and local politicians who choose to lead the charge or man the barricades.

whiskeydaisy:

While we’re talking about awesome women in the Texas legislature (Wendy Davis, Leticia Van de Putte, Mary Gonzalez, Alma Allen, and everyone else who extended the debate in the House and supported Davis during the Senate filibuster), let me introduce you to Texas State Representative Senfronia Thompson, who represents the north Houston area.

Rep. Thompson, at the time a public school teacher, was elected to the Texas house in 1972 and is currently serving her 20th term in office. I don’t usually copy/paste Wikipedia, but this is as concise as a description of her career can be:

Thompson has chaired both the Texas Legislative Black Caucus and the Women’s Health Caucus. She is also a member of the Democratic National Committee, a state director of Women in Government, and a member of the Energy Council. She serves on the House Committees on Judiciary and Civil Jurisprudence, State Sovereignty, Licensing and Administrative Procedures, and chairs the Local and Consent Calendar procedural committee. For 12 years, she chaired the House Judicial Affairs Committees. In 1987, she chaired the first standing committee in the Legislature to have a female majority.

Thompson has authored and passed more than 200 Texas laws, including Texas´ first alimony law, the James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Act, laws prohibiting racial profiling, the state minimum wage, the Durable Power of Attorney Act, the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act, the Sexual Assault Program Fund, the Model School Records Flagging Act, the Uniform Child Custody & Jurisdiction Enforcement Act, contraceptive parity, and scores of other reforms benefiting women, children and the elderly. Thompson pushed through major reforms in child support enforcement, simplified probate proceedings, and complete overhauls of statutes dealing with statutory county courts and municipal courts. In 2005, she passed legislation requiring free testing for the human papilloma virus (HPV), an early indicator of cervical cancer, for women who have health insurance.

This is the woman who, while speaking in the House against the parallel bill to SB50, hung a wire coat hanger on the podium. Rep. Thompson is 74. She remembers the days before Roe v. Wade. She knows what the world looks like to women who do not have accessible, safe medical care. 

We often focus our accolades on people who serve at the national level. Yesterday was a good reminder that battles are fought on the ground, and it’s our state and local politicians who choose to lead the charge or man the barricades.

lilithfund:

And I never forgot that. There she was, not trying to be pregnant when her first grandchild was going to make its entry into the world because she wanted to be available for her daughter’s child. And in the process of doing this she loses her life, through an illegal abortion with a coat hanger. She hemorrhaged to death. 


That’s the reason why I used that coat hanger in my remarks. I always remember her — Mrs. Bell, that was her name. And I always think about her when abortion is talked about. I always think about that coat hanger. There’s probably many women who saw the end of their journey in life the same way. Women whose names remain nameless and faceless to this day.”

Rep. Senfronia Thompson, from the oral history of the filibuster from fightbacktx.org

bethanysworld:

This woman! “I’m tired of Planned Parenthood getting kicked in the teeth.” - Representative Senfronia Thompson #texas #politics #government #txlege

lilithfund:

Thousands of supporters were, and are, the driving force. 

lilithfund:

Thousands of supporters were, and are, the driving force. 

Well, no. I had never planned to be there that day. We held the funeral service for my dad late that afternoon at Fort Sam, in San Antonio, and I was not planning on returning to Austin. My colleagues in the Senate, both Republican and Democrat, had told me that Wendy was supposed to start her filibuster and that they were just going to let her ride it out and then they would call a special session the next morning. I don’t know when that changed. But I do know that my family was gathered for supper, and my kids and grandkids had put together a photo montage of Bimple—that’s what they called my father. And about the time I was looking at that on my iPad, my chief of staff, Gilbert Loredo, who has been with me for seventeen years, came up and said, “I hate to tell you this, but they just called Senator Davis on the second point of order.” I said, “What do you mean, point of order? Isn’t she just talking?” He said, “No. They changed the plans. They’ve got two Republican senators on thirty-minute shifts, and one is watching everything she does and one is watching everything she says. They’ve decided they’re not going to let her achieve this.”

At that moment I looked up, and there’s a picture on my iPad from when I was governor for a day; I’d called out my dad, and he was standing up and blowing me kisses. And I thought of all the times that my dad stood up for me. The memories just kept coming back, of things like that he would do when I was introduced to his friends, you know, and they would say, “Oh, what a pretty little girl,” or in Spanish, “Oh, qué niña más bonita.” And my dad says, it’s the first thing out of his mouth, “She’s the smartest in her class. Es la más inteligente.” I wasn’t, but because my dad said I was, I thought I might be. And because I thought I might be, I studied a lot. And then I never had the Barbie girl figure, so I understand the little girl growing up in the fifties and the sixties who had big thighs. So what my dad taught me was that it wasn’t what I looked like, it was how smart I was and the strength that I had. My dad was so formative in those early years, when the messages to girls were very different. All that came rushing back, and I looked at Gilbert and said, “I have to go.” Then I said, “If they’ve already called the second point of order, I won’t make it.” He says, “I have DPS outside.”

I went because I thought that if Wendy saw me, she might get some strength from that, but I never intended to say anything, because I was at the bottom of an emotional well. I had nothing left. And it wasn’t just about my dad’s death—we had also lost our grandson during the session. I said what I said out of frustration. I wasn’t thinking about my political future. But it was a toxic summer. It was hurtful to see how the collegiality and the good work that we had done during the legislative session—and we did good work during the legislative session—was tossed aside.

emilys-list:

New ad from Leticia Van de Putte. Must watch!

We occasionally get hate messages at the office, but this piece of mail was noteworthy for the level of delusion (and craftiness)! This is what some Texans think of female political candidates - and when we show up and vote pro-choice, we show hateful people like this just what a small, fringe minority they are. Remember in November!

Wellll here’s an interesting look at the kind of hate mail places like NARAL get…

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

Getting an abortion doesn’t make you selfish or irresponsible, it’s acknowledging you can’t go through a pregnancy, for whatever reason, it’s acknowledging that you’re not ready to parent, it’s acknowledging that you do not have the funds to go through a pregnancy and parenthood. I don’t know about you, but that sounds pretty responsible to me.

(via pro-choice-or-no-voice)

genderpunk-dragon:

bandersnatchery:

"Vancouver School Board Introduces Gender-Neutral Pronouns"

"Students and teachers in Vancouver can now use the gender-neutral pronouns "xe," "xem," and "xyr." The move is designed to accommodate students for whom "he" and "she" does not fit or is deemed inappropriate…

"The newly coined pronouns — xe, xem, and xyr — are pronounced to rhyme with the genderless plurals "they," "them," and "their," and all starting with the "z" sound. So phonetically speaking, they’re pronounced "zey, "zem", and "zare.""

(Source: io9)

Click here to read the full article.

the article doesn’t do the issue justice.

the issue regarded policy change, where the vancouver school board’s (VSB) LGBTQ+ advisory committee re-wrote existing policy to protect staff and students falling on the queer and trans spectrums. 

the policy revision includes

-they/them/their and non-traditional pronouns being recognized by the school system

-required used of preferred names and pronouns by all staff and students

-preferred names/pronouns on all school records

-gender-accesible washrooms and change rooms available to those who require them

-disciplinary action taken against those who act in a discriminatory or hateful manner towards students, staff, and families falling on the queer and trans spectrums

—————-

the consultation was the longest ever done by the VSB, with over 120 speakers spread across 3 meetings. 

the process also resulting in two school board trustees being ejected form their party’s caucus, due their discriminatory actions and arguments. 

these are links to stories by vancouver media about the issue

CBC

metro news

global BC

huffington post

(via whimsicalapothecary)

gurl:

7 Tips On How To Deal If You Think Your Friend Is Gay

I completely understand how much you want to be there for your friend, but I also understand how touchy this subject is. So what are you supposed to do? Here are 7 tips on how to deal if you think your friend is gay. Trust me, they’ll thank you for reading this.

We have to stop categorizing abortions as justified or unjustified. The best thing you can do if you support reproductive rights is to force people to realize that abortion is common, and the most common abortion is a five-to-15-minute procedure elected early in the first trimester by someone who doesn’t want to be pregnant or have a child. It’s our job to say it’s O.K. if that’s the end of the story. It’s O.K. if it’s boring or not traumatic or if you don’t even know what it was.
This is What an Abortion Looks Like, Merrit Tierce in the New York Times (via seachangeprogram)

(via apersnicketylemon)